The Fluency Game at Sunflower River Farm

Enjoy watching the good time we had hosted by Alan Post and the good folks at Sunflower River Farm! Or try the direct download here. Vodpod videos no longer available.

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11 thoughts on “The Fluency Game at Sunflower River Farm

    • Jay-
      Welcome to the blog. In the game at Sunflower we used a black pen, a red pen, a dollar, a stick, and a white stone; in the WAYK logo above you can see similar objects. We often use these exact props, whenever we can. Also, of course, keys, if available, work nicely.

  1. You know, it occurrs to me that this feels a bit (or ”looks”, as i haven’t played it yet – and it *feels* like i would gain a much deeper understanding of it by just playing it) I think it looks a bit like singing in groups, where the other folks know the song, and you just know a little of it, but you catch on to what the others sing, you know? Of course, in this game you can still learn the words by just singing (or ”signing”) along even if you dont know the words from beforehand, hehe, marvelous đŸ˜€

  2. The first thing Evan says in this video is “ok, here’s another technique”.

    I want to know what came before that. How does Evan introduce the game? What is the very first thing he says?

  3. Jay-
    He described the “obviously!” technique, but the video/audio quality (shaking, etc.) made it unwatchable.

    Your question does get me curious though; in Bookend #1 Evan provides a fairly complete intro on the game; why do you ask about this video?

    Also keep in mind that Evan’s intro varies according to audience and context, as does mine. You can’t really go wrong with marking techniques “Set-up”, “Travels with Charlie”, and “Obviously” as a quick way to get things started.

  4. OK, I went back and reviewed that part of Bookened #1, and that was helpful.

    Evan starts with: “Welcome to where are your keys. We have a couple techniques.”

    What comes before THAT? Suppose you are hanging out with someone and you think they might be interested. What do you tell them?

    I’ve tried something like “I’m learning this cool way learning or teaching languages, by playing a game called ‘Where are your Keys?’ Would you like to try it out and learn some sign language?”

    Or just “hey, anyone want to learn some sign language? Come sit over here and play this game.”

    What would you say?

  5. It sounds like you’ve got it already.

    If you ask someone if they like the idea of learning new languages really fast, and if they like playing games, and they say “yes” to both counts, well heck. You’ve found somebody to play with!

    In your case you have an extra thing too: if you tell people you need some help practicing a high-speed language learning game that’s a lot of fun, well there you go. I bet you’d get a lot of “sure, I’ll help you!” in response.

  6. Pingback: Play the Game with Evan « "Where Are Your Keys?": The Language Fluency Game

  7. Pingback: El CurricĂºlo RĂ¡pido Universal: Translating the “Universal Speed Curriculum” « "Where Are Your Keys?": The Language Fluency Game

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